Archive for the ‘Comic Book Study’ Category

NOTE: This is one of a two-part post on Batman fighting Superman, and why Superman would win any of those fights. If you want to see the reasons why Batman would win, click here.

Welcome back to Batman/Superman Month everyone! For today’s two-part post, I thought it’d be fun to examine both Batman and Superman as fighters, and explain the reasons why each one stands a pretty good chance of winning in a serious fight.

For Superman, it’s easy to see why he’d emerge victorious. First, he’s invincible. Sure, kryptonite, red sun radation, and magic are all problems, but aside from those, almost nothing can truly hurt Superman. You’d have to either trick him (which, to be fair, can and does happen) or hit him really, really hard to do any lasting damage, and unless the Man of Steel is written terribly or is just feeling very generous in a fight, Batman shouldn’t be able to get anywhere near him.

This brings us to the second point: his super senses. Batman may be quick, able to sneak around in the shadows, and ambush thugs and muggers, but Superman can see past all that. His telescopic and X-Ray vision can pick out Batman anywhere he hides, super hearing can hear all the shuffles of leathery capes and clicks of boots on the ground, and who’s to say Superman couldn’t just smell him if he wanted to? This is, of course, ignoring the new super power he developed somewhat recently in The New 52 line, where Superman developed the ability to identify energy and signals from all over the world. Using this power, it’d be even easier for him to find Batman, given that the Batsuit always has a lot of complicated circuitry and links to the Batmobile.

Third, let’s examine the idea of prep time. A number of Batman fans will argue that Batman can beat anyone, given the right amount of time to gather resources and prepare for the confrontation, and for the most part, they’d be correct. However, in the interest of fairness, Superman would have to be given prep time too, outright nullifying anything Bats would ever come up with. Although it’s never really been played up much lately, Superman is actually a genius, his brain able to work faster than the fastest Earth supercomputers, which (if written to its full potential) would allow Superman to super speed think his way out of any conceivable trap. But even going with every comic where Batman somehow tricks Supes and gets the upper hand, you can still point out a ton of different ways Superman should, realistically, be able to get away and win the fight.

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Why not just use heat vision on the mouth part of the suit? Image via screenrant.com

Fourth, and most importantly, we can just look at history: Batman has never beaten Superman in a true one on one fight in canon DC comic books.

Yes, Batman has defeated Superman in the past (most notably in Superman: Red Son and The Dark Knight Returns), but the same outcome never happens in canon. Batman has always slowed down Superman, but never truly managed to take him down. The only time I can truly remember Batman “winning” was against a maddened Superman in Batman: Endgame, when all of the Justice League (save for Batman) was infected with their own custom versions of Joker toxin. He did manage to spit kryptonite into Superman’s eye and ended the fight there, but if we look at what we’ve seen before in this post, and remember that Superman can do pretty much anything he wants (he’s been able to phase through objects), then this also should not have been a problem. Remember Batman #612, where the Dark Knight fought a Poison Ivy influenced Superman? He even commented that Superman could “squish [him] into the pavement if he wanted to.” What does that tell you?

What do you think about Superman beating Batman? Let me know in the comments below, or with a tweet through that widget on the left. Don’t forget to also like the Comic Books vs The World Facebook page, subscribe to the official Youtube channel, and follow the official Comic Books vs The World Instagram to keep up with all the latest on Comic Books vs The World. Be sure to keep coming back for more Batman/Superman Month!

NOTE: This is one of a two-part post on Batman fighting Superman, and why Batman would win any of those fights. If you want to see the reasons why Superman would win, click here.

Welcome back to Batman/Superman Month everyone! For today’s two-part post, I thought it’d be fun to examine both Batman and Superman as fighters, and explain the reasons why each one stands a pretty good chance of winning in a serious fight.

It’s very easy to see why Batman could wipe the floor with Superman in any given fight. For one thing, he’s been developing anti-Justice League plans for years, including thick dossiers on how to defeat Superman. By now, it’d be near impossible for Superman to think up all the different plans and strategies Batman devised and plan around each one of those things for a one on one fight (assuming, of course, that Superman is well informed of the fight beforehand, and actually decides to get prepared).

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Because Superman always gets prepared when he absolutely knows a fight’s about to happen… Image via screenrant.com

Batman’s habit of using specialized gadgets would especially come into play when in a fight against Superman. During the fight in Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice, the Dark Knight had guns, strength enhancing devices (which I’ll get into further detail about below), and lead based smoke grenades to help get around Superman’s abilities and level the playing field. Other comics have shown Batman also using a city’s power supply, bombs, the ever famous kryptonite, and a variety of other gadgets to help put Superman in his place.

Despite what a number of Superman fans might think, the Man of Steel does absolutely have limits and can absolutely be beaten to the brink of, or even to, death, if you hit him hard enough. So naturally, Batman’s taken to using a number of power suits in fights against Superman where he means business, all of which boost his physical abilities to rival that of his opponent. Two of the better known examples are the famous The Dark Knight Returns suit:

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Image via screenrant.com

And my personal favorite, the Scott Snyder “Justice Buster” suit:

Unlike the previous suit of the 1980s (that functioned mostly as basic power enhancing armor with Batman gadgets thrown in), this thing had everything a Man of Steel opponent would need. Kryptonite capsules near the mouth so you could spit it in his face. Miniaturized red suns in the knuckles to beat Superman with. Options to counteract heat vision and freeze breath. And it was one tough piece of machinery to boot.

If all else fails, Batman could also just get ahold of a magical item and use that. Superman isn’t super resistant to magic like he is to almost everything else, so Batman could absolutely get something magic from one of the many people in the DC Universe with magical items, then use that item on Superman. This entire list is, of course, also ignoring the classic “just use kryptonite” routine that Batman has always used on Superman. How does the saying go? “If it ain’t broke…”?

Probably the most important thing to keep in mind is that Superman can never, and will never, go all out on Batman. I don’t necessarily mean Superman will never try to kill Batman (which he won’t), but instead he’ll never actually take a fight with Batman as seriously as Batman does. There are lines Batman will cross that Superman won’t come anywhere near. It’s like Batman said in Batman #612: “Even more than the Kryptonite, [Superman]’s got one big weakness. Deep down, Clark’s essentially a good person… and deep down, I’m not.” What does that tell you?

What do you think about Batman beating Superman? Let me know in the comments below, or with a tweet through that widget on the left. Don’t forget to also like the Comic Books vs The World Facebook page, subscribe to the official Youtube channel, and follow the official Comic Books vs The World Instagram to keep up with all the latest on Comic Books vs The World. Be sure to keep coming back for more Batman/Superman Month!

WARNING: Major spoilers ahead

If you saw last night’s episode of The Flash, chances are your mind is probably blown right now. Zoom was finally unmasked, showing off the face of…Jay Garrick? Wait, what?

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Image via ew.com

What?! How did this work out? After confirming that Zoom is “Hunter Zolomon, a.k.a Jay Garrick,” the executive producer of the show, Andrew Kreisberg, was quoted as saying the following to Entertainment Weekly:

The irony, of course, is the one person who has been saying, ‘Don’t trust this guy! Don’t trust this guy! Don’t trust this guy!’ has been Harry, who’s the one that none of them trusted…the reason he was able to manipulate them was because he was playing on their emotions. It wasn’t because they were gullible. They actually took precautions in the beginning — Barry locked him up right away — but all of them had that need for a center and for a new star to right their ships by. Jay’s one charming, smooth guy and he was able to manipulate them in that way.

So Jay was playing them all the whole time? Makes sense after all; a lot of what he did was incredibly suspicious and led a number of viewers (yours truly included) to question the man from the start. But why was he working for Zoom the whole time, especially when we know that he’s been the Flash on Earth-2? Was all of Zoom’s focus on Barry Allen’s speed this whole time? If so, then who’s the guy in the mask locked up in Zoom’s lair? He seemed pretty upset when he saw Garrick’s lifeless body dropped on the ground at the end of the episode.

Theory Time

So who is Jay Garrick/Zoom, and how does the man in the mask fit into all this?

Let’s start with the man in the iron mask. I think it’s safe to say that he’s the real Jay Garrick. Look at the facts: he knows an old POW code (probably taught to him by his father, a soldier in the “War of the Americas”), he freaked out after tapping out the name “Jay” to Barry in a previous episode and Barry began talking about the Jay Garrick we were familiar with, and, as numerous fans have pointed out, his complexion and hair cut seemed almost identitical to Jay Garrick.

*Just as a side note, I think it’s extremely interesting how the man tapped out “Zoom is” before Barry and Jesse knew that he was using a code, and afterwards tapped out the “Jay” name. Almost like we were flat out being told way in advance…*

But what does this mean for Zoom and Jay? My best guess is that they are clones. It’s not like the comics never set a precedent on Jay Garrick clones, after all.

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Yes, even the comic version of the clone had a black costume. Image via gamespot.com

In the One Year Later story arc for The Outsiders, a brainwashed clone of Jay Garrick appeared as an antagonist for the comic’s heroes. It was explained that the clone was suffering from cellular degeneration, which was made even worse by the metagene within the clone’s genes. By the way, remember what problem Caitlin noticed was going on with Jay’s cells in a previous episode of The Flash?

Jay Garrick: No, I did a terrible thing, Caitlin. When my world’s particle accelerator went off, I became a speedster. I became the fastest man alive, only… only it wasn’t enough for me. I wasn’t… I wasn’t fast enough. So I figured with my scientific background, I could increase my powers, and… I did.
Caitlin Snow: So you’ve taken Velocity-6 before?
Jay Garrick: Yes. But there were some… unforeseen side effects.
Caitlin Snow: This is why you didn’t want Barry to take it, or even know about it. Zoom never stole your speed. This is what’s making you sick. Velocity-6 is killing you.

Too vague? Listen to this clip from episode 14:

While it’s not exactly iron clad evidence, Caitlin does specifically mention “cellular degeneration” in regards to Jay’s condition.

But how does this play into my theory? I believe that Jay (the real Jay, the man in the metal mask), whether on accident or purposefully, created clones of himself while tampering with his abilities, with one clone becoming the Jay Garrick we knew and the other becoming Earth-2’s Hunter Zolomon/Zoom. Although both clones have Jay’s appearance and powers, neither is a completely pure copy, and are suffering from cellular degeneration.

Because of this, Zoom convinces the Jay clone that they need to work together to find a solution. Trapping the original Earth-2 Jay, the two managed to find Barry Allen’s timeline after searching through the Speed Force and plan to steal his speed to increase their lifespans (remember, Grant Gustin did say that Zoom had been peeking in timelines for a while before the events of season two started). Clone Jay is sent through a breach to infiltrate Team Flash and increase Barry’s speed to the necessary levels, while Zoom continues business on Earth-2.

However, after realizing that Earth-2 Harry has created Velocity 6 (the same formula the original Jay made) Clone Jay starts manipulating Caitlin to improve on the formula, working off of the theory that it would be a viable substitute to fixing his condition. Clone Jay then makes the decision to betray his clone brother and stay in Earth-1, which gets him killed by Zoom and complicates Zoom’s plans on getting Barry faster.

The Flash will return Tuesday, March 22 at 8 p.m. ET on The CW.

What do you think of this theory? Do you agree with any part of it, or is it way too crazy to be true? Let me know in the comments below, or with a tweet through that widget on the left. While you’re at it, like the Comic Books vs The World Facebook page, subscribe to the official Youtube channel, and follow the official Comic Books vs The World Instagram to keep up with all the latest on Comic Books vs The World.

NOTE: This is just a fan theory. Nothing I discuss has been confirmed or denied. All opinions are my own. Spoilers will follow.

Who is Dr. Jason Wilkes? This is a question that’s been pressing on my mind for some time now, given that he’s seemed very familiar ever since he first appeared on screen in the beginning of the second season of Agent Carter. However, it wasn’t until the explosion at Isodyne Energy in episode 2 that I finally managed to place a name to the face: Jason Wilkes is actually Adam Brashear, otherwise known as the Blue Marvel.

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Blue Marvel vs Hyperion. Image taken from wikipedia.org

Don’t just take my word for it, especially when the show gives us a ton of evidence to go off of.

1. Know Thy Enemy

First, let’s take a look at Agent Carter‘s version of Whitney Frost. In the comics, Frost is actually the woman behind the villanous persona Madame Masque, an enemy/lover of Iron Man. While it doesn’t necessarily matter that Marvel decided to make her a villain in the 1940s (her adventures place her in the modern day with the rest of the superhero community), what does matter is her wildly changed backstory.

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This is a lie! Image taken from comicbook.com

In the comics, Frost has no abilities, but does wear a mask to cover her damaged face after a chemical accident. Interestingly, the Agent Carter showrunners have already stated (in an interview with IGN) that viewers will absolutely not be seeing Frost wearing the golden mask. Here’s the statement from producer Michelle Fazekas.

You’re not going to see her in a gold mask, but it’s not like you’re not going to see something.

How does the Blue Marvel fit into this? As it stands now, Frost has a lot in common with Blue Marvel’s villain, Anti-Man, such as:

  1. Both characters share a connection, and abilities, with their adversaries.
  2. Blue Marvel once defeated Anti-Man by draining his energy, similar to how Dr. Wilkes drained some Zero Matter from Frost.
  3. Both Anti-Man and Frost have some history with prejudice (Anti-Man despises racism in any form, having seen what it does to his friend, while Frost grew up in a society that looked down on independent thinking and intelligent females).

Of course, this is all just side pieces of information, since the real clue is in:

2. Know Thy Self

Believe it or not, Wilkes and Brashear share a lot in common.

  1. Both are geniuses tapping into otherworldly forces.
  2. Both share history with their villains.
  3. Both are caught in an explosion involving the otherwordly force they are experimenting on.

Wilkes also dissolved into energy after the accidental Zero Matter explosion and continually faded in and out of our plane of existance, similar to how Anti-Man’s body would behave after his accidental exposure to anti-matter energy.

The biggest difference is in the forces being experimented on. Brashear in the comics experimented with accessing the Negative Zone, intending to use the Zone’s anti-matter to create a source of clean energy. Given that the Negative Zone is still owned by Fox, along with the rest of the Fantastic Four properties, it makes sense that the version of Brashear on the show would use Darkforce instead, a similar otherworldly energy that Marvel hasn’t really played with yet in any of their on screen properties.

Agent Carter airs Tuesdays at 9 p.m. ET on ABC.

What do you think about Dr. Wilkes being the Blue Marvel? Let me know in the comments below, or with a tweet through that widget on the left. While you’re at it, like the Comic Books vs The World Facebook page, subscribe to the official Youtube channel, and follow the official Comic Books vs The World Instagram to keep up with all the latest on Comic Books vs The World.

NOTE: This is just a fan theory. Nothing I discuss has been confirmed or denied. All opinions are my own. Spoilers will follow.

The past: a new and uncertain world. A world of endless possibilities and infinite outcomes. Countless choices define our fate: each choice, each moment, a moment in the ripple of time. Enough ripple, and you change the tide… for the future is never truly set. – Charles Xavier, X-Men: Days of Future Past

Not too long ago, I published what I consider to be the (currently) correct versions of both the Original and Revised timelines in the X-Men Cinematic Universe, both of which you can read here. However, there still exists a major problem, not just for the timelines I’ve created, but for every single person who ever attempts to work out even a single sequence of events for the X-Men universe: continuity. The films are notorious for creating numerous continuity errors, from confusingly reusing names/powers (“Emma” Silverfox in X-Men Origins and “Emma” Frost in X-Men: First Class) to casting different actors to play the same character in different time periods, such as Psylocke’s use in 2006 and in the 1980s.

While it’s easy to simply chalk this up to lazy filmmakers not paying attention and screwing up the sequence of events in the films, I believe there’s actually a logical way to explain away most, if not all, of the continuity errors. To do that, we’ll have to take a look at time travel in the X-Men Cinematic Universe and how the flow of time in that universe is affected by time travel, then apply it to the symmetry of time and the ripples caused from disturbing the natural flow of things.

The Simple(ish) Stuff

First, let’s talk about the easier to explain aspects of Logan’s time travel adventure. Just before she sends Logan back through time in Days of Future Past, Kitty Pryde somewhat explains “the rules” of time travel with this line:

“Basically your body will go to sleep while your mind travels back in time. As long as you’re back there past and present will continue to co-exist. But once you wake up, whatever you’ve done will take hold and become history. And for the rest of us it will be the only history that we know. It will be like the last 50 years never happened. This world. This war. The only person who will remember it is you.”

There’s a number of different fields and ideas present in this one line, but let’s start with the simplest. Clearly, the entire Days of Future Past film is a gigantic example of the Butterfly Effect, or the changes caused by various factors made in a specific point in space and time. I wrote up a sort of joke example of this a while back, using both modern versions of Fox’s Fantastic Four as the focal point, which you can read here. You could also watch the quick lesson Jeff Goldblum’s character gave about the Butterfly Effect and Chaos Theory in 1993’s Jurassic Park, as linked below.

Now, let’s apply this to Days of Future Past. Think back to when Logan attacked those thugs when he first arrives in 1973. Let’s assume that, in the original version of events, Logan killed all of the thugs in the room, leading him to the decision to leave the mob and re-enlist in the military/serve another tour of duty and fight in the Vietnam War (which would eventually lead to X-Men Origins: Wolverine and the rest of the Original Timeline).

However, because this time he stole a car and traveled to the X-Mansion (leading to the rest of the events of Days of Future Past), now we have an entirely new timeline. This time around, Logan (so far as we know) never met the original William Stryker, never received his adamantium implants in the same manner we saw before, never lost his memory from adamantium bullets, and never spent 15 years trying to figure out who he really is. Keep in mind that this is just one of many different changes that have occurred due to Days of Future Past.

In a way, you can think about this as something like Back to the Future, in that changes in the timeline’s future are more severe the more the time traveler meddles in past events. However, keep in mind that the X-Men films differ ever so slightly in exactly how time travel affects a timeline. While most people, myself included, have been trying to see time as a simple forking path diagram, what I realized is that we should be looking at it more like water (or, if you’d prefer, a “big ball of wibbly wobbly, timey-whimey stuff”). We’ll get into more detail with this further below.

A Little More Detail

This is where things start to get a little more complicated, but bear with me. Time is not, has not, and never will be, a simple, one way direction. It only appears that way because human beings aren’t equipped to see past, present, and future all at once. These concepts are man-made to describe different aspects of the here and now. Picture it like a large wall at the end of a corridor. You can’t go backwards, and you know there’s something on the other side of the wall down the hall, but you can’t tell for sure exactly what’s back there. Therefore, a time traveler is an individual who is not only able to “peek around the corner” and see what’s ahead, but can also choose to walk back the way they came.

Another way of putting it is through the television show Doctor Who. If you’re a fan of the show, then you should already understand the reference I made with the clip in the last section. If not, that’s okay. I’ve got you covered:

What the good doctor is explaining in the clip is the concept known as “retro-causation”, otherwise known as retrocausality. Generally speaking, it’s the idea that effects can happen before whatever caused them takes place.

Remember how I said earlier that time is like water? It flows, and if you drop something into it, you’ll create a number of ripples. The size and reach of these ripples depend on the size of the object dropped in and the force it has when it hits the water. This is where my theory comes in: why do the “ripples” only occur in one direction through time? More importantly, why should we believe that they do? Much like water, ripples don’t just extend in one direction in time.

Now, let’s apply all of this to the X-Men Cinematic Universe, using Nightcrawler’s birthday as an example. In the Original Timeline, I’ve established it to be in 1956, given that X2: X-Men United takes place in the 1990s. There’s a clear correlation between cause and effect here: Nightcrawler was conceived (the cause), leading to his birth in 1956 (the effect). Retrocausality would then make it so that Nightcrawler’s birth would take place before his actual conception date, which could help explain why his new birth date is in 1964 (in the Revised Timeline).

Remember what I said before about the forked timeline diagram? These two different birthdates are before Logan’s arrival, and shouldn’t be affected by Days of Future Past, rendering the idea of retrocausality impossible. However, if we believe that widespread ripples can and do cause retrocausality, then this gets cleared right up. To sum it up, if time is like water, Logan is like a rock being dropped into the water. The ripples caused from him landing are the changes in time.

Summed Up

As I’ve stated before, I think it’s very clear that the ripple effect exists when it comes to time travel in the X-Men Cinematic Universe. Not only that, but depending on the actions a time traveler makes in that universe, there must be an equal amount of ripples changing things in the past.

Rather than using the plot hole creating fork diagram, if we were to apply this idea to the X-Men Cinematic Universe, we can then make sense of the other changes occurring. Logan attacking some thugs in a random room when he probably shouldn’t have? Might make for a slight amount of ripples and minor changes, such as changing around some people’s ages. Stopping the Sentinel program from taking off in the first place? Now Xavier and Magneto don’t meet at 17, they meet as fully grown men. I could pull up more examples, but the point is this: Logan wouldn’t just be changing the future when he went back in time. Thanks to the huge amount of changes he would make to the timeline’s future, Logan would also be changing the past.

What do you think about this interpretation of time and time travel in the X-Men universe? Let me know in the comments below, or with a tweet through that widget on the left. While you’re at it, like the Comic Books vs The World Facebook page, subscribe to the official Youtube channel, and follow the official Comic Books vs The World Instagram to keep up with all the latest on Comic Books vs The World.

Welcome back to Deadpool Month guys and gals! You know what’s awesome? Being able to play a game and find a version of yourself in it!

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Look, it’s me! Image taken from fightersgeneration.com

Isn’t that awesome?

Yeah, great. But how useful are we in this game?

I like the part where we beat people with our life bar!

Woah guys, one step at a time. First, let’s start with the basics.

Didn’t the guy who normally writes this blog do something like this for Daredevil?

TO THE BASICS!

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BANG BANG BANG! Image taken from youtube.com

The Basics

Believe it or not, I’m actually not that bad of a Scrapper right out of the gate. My Health, Attack, Defense, and Accuracy are pretty decent (although I will say, my Evasion’s a tad bit off for some reason). All four of my attacks can be built up to give out a bunch of debuffs to the bad guys, while buffing me up to no end! Stack me with a Guardian Insignia for maximum buffs!

Or use our character specific ISO-8, Savory and Spicy. Basically, one gives us life when we die, the other protects the team and makes enemies bleed when we use our swords (on the attack “Sharp Pointy Things”). You players will have to beat Heroic Battles to have a chance at getting both of them.

Wait, we weren’t making enemies bleed before? With swords?! What kind of bulls#!t is that Playdom?!

Heroic Battle

I get a Heroic Battle too? This game’s got everything!

Close to it. Actually, we team up with Cable and fight the U-Foes.

The U-Foes? Who cares about them?

We do apparently, since we’re scrappin’ with ’em. Yo dawg, I heard you like Scrappers-

No, not again!

Unlockables

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Image taken from marvel.com

Well damn, check me out! Isn’t that costume awesome?!

It looks gray!

…Right…But it also has a bunch of really cool perks too. When we have this suit, we can give other X-Force members on our team candy, and-

Candy? What, do we get a windowless van with this upgrade too?

No! It gives our team the Boon Buster effect for single target attacks. That means we can pretty much increase our strength against anyone with stat boosting effects.

Boon Buster eh? I like the sound of it!

Me too!

Team Worthy?

What do you think? Of course I’m f@#cking team worthy! I’m already super awesome in this game, and now I’ve got the extras to back me up! Sure, I may cost 135 Command Points, but who cares when you can play as me?

Add in the extra 60 points for the X-Force costume, plus whatever they end up charging for our movie costume…

Shut up.

CHARACTER GRADE: 7.5/10

So…this is weird…

What is?

I saw an edited version of the Batman v Superman trailer by Aldo Jones, and…well, just look. You too reader. I think you’re gonna like this.

Wow. That is some weird s#!%.

I know right?! I loved it!

Oh boy…

Does he do more? Because that was awesome!

Sure does! Check them out right here.

What’d you think of Aldo’s edits on the trailer? Let me know in the comments below, or with a tweet through that widget on the left. While you’re at it, like the Comic Books vs The World Facebook page, subscribe to the official Youtube channel, and follow the official Comic Books vs The World Instagram to keep up with all the latest on Comic Books vs The World (you know, since I’m here for now). Keep coming back for Deadpool Month!